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Search Plan and Results

Question(s)

What are the effects of multi-component compared to single-component nutrition education interventions on children’s dietary intake-related behaviors?

Date Searched

January 2011

Inclusion Criteria

  • Subjects/population: Human subjects; populations in countries with very high or high human development, according to the Human Development Index
  • Age: Zero to 18 years of age
  • Setting: School home, and community settings
  • Health status: Healthy and those with elevated chronic disease risk (CHD/CVD, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity)
  • Study design preferences: Randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies (search to include all study designs); studies must have compared a condition with a multi-component nutrition education intervention to a condition with a single-component intervention
  • Year range: Studies published since January 1995
  • Authorship: If an author is included on more than one review article or primary research article that is similar in content, the paper with the most pertinent data/endpoints will be included. If data/endpoints from both papers are appropriate, it will be made clear that results are from the same intervention.
  • Languages: Limited to articles in English
  •  Other: Article must be published in peer-reviewed journal.

Exclusion Criteria

  • Subjects/population: Animal and in vitro studies; populations in countries with medium or low human development, according to the Human Development Index
  • Study design preferences: Studies lacking a control group
  • Age: Adults age 19 years and older
  • Setting: Hospitalized patients
  • Health status: Medical treatment/therapy and subjects diagnosed with disease
  • Nutrition-telated problem/condition: All conditions
  • Study design preferences:
    • Systematic reviews
    • Meta-analysis
    • Prospective cohort studies
    • Cross-sectional studies
    • Case-control studies
    • Narrative reviews
  • Year range: Prior to January 1995
  • Authorship: Studies by same author similar in content
  • Languages: Articles not in English
  • Other: Abstracts or presentations and articles not peer reviewed (i.e., Web sites, magazine articles, Federal reports).

Search Terms & Electronic Databases Used

  • Search date: 5/2010, 7/2010, 8/2010, 9/2010, 10/2010, 11/2010, 12/2010, 1/2011
  • Date range: 1995 to Present
  • Search terms: (Search “child nutrition sciences/education”[mh] OR “nutritional sciences/ education”[mh] OR (nutrition* AND (“Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice”[mh] OR “health education/methods”[mh] OR “Health Behavior”[mh] OR “Health Promotion/methods”[mh])) Limits: Humans, English, All Child: 0-18 years, Publication Date from 1995. 

 

  • Search date: 5/10/10
  • Date range: 1995 to Present
  • Search terms: 'Nutrition education'/exp AND ([article]/lim OR [article in press]/lim) AND ([newborn]/lim OR [infant]/lim OR [preschool]/lim OR [school]/lim OR [child]/lim OR [adolescent]/lim) AND [humans]/lim AND [english]/lim AND [embase]/lim AND [1995-2010]/py.

  • EBSCOhost: CINAHL; ERIC; PsycINFO; PsycARTICLES; SocINDEX with full text; Education research complete
  • Search date: 5/11/10; 1/3/11
  • Date range: 1995 to Present
  • Search terms: SU nutrition* n2 education* and behavior*.

Total hits from all electronic database searches: 3538

Total articles identified to review from electronic databases: 432

Articles Identified Via Handsearch or Other Means

Hand Search

  • Search date: July 2010 to December 2010
  • Selected articles: Two.

DeBar LL, Ritenbaugh C, Aickin M, Orwoll E, Elliot D, Dickerson J, Vuckovic N, Stevens VJ, Moe E, Irving LM. Youth: A health plan-based lifestyle intervention increases bone mineral density in adolescent girls. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Dec; 160(12): 1, 269-1, 276. Erratum in: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Feb; 161(2): 130. PMID: 17146025.

Hopper CA, Gruber MB, Munoz KD, MacConnie S. School-based cardiovascular exercise and nutrition programs with parent participation. J Health Educ. 1996; 27: S32–S39.

 


Summary of Articles Identified to Review

Number of Primary Articles Identified: 14

Number of Review Articles Identified: 0

Total Number of Articles Identified: 14

Number of Articles Reviewed but Excluded: 420

 




List of Included Articles for Evidence Analysis

DeBar LL, Ritenbaugh C, Aickin M, Orwoll E, Elliot D, Dickerson J, Vuckovic N, Stevens VJ, Moe E, Irving LM. Youth: A health plan-based lifestyle intervention increases bone mineral density in adolescent girls. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Dec; 160(12): 1, 269-1, 276. Erratum in: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Feb; 161(2): 130. PMID: 17146025.

He M, Beynon C, Sangster Bouck M, St Onge R, Stewart S, Khoshaba L, Horbul BA, Chircoski B. Impact evaluation of the Northern Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Programme: A cluster-randomised controlled trial. Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov; 12(11): 2, 199-2, 208. Epub: 2009 May 28. PMID: 19476675.

Hopper CA, Munoz KD, Gruber MB, Nguyen KP. The effects of a family fitness program on the physical activity and nutrition behaviors of third-grade children. Res Q Exerc Sport. 2005 Jun; 76(2): 130-139. PMID: 16128481.

Hopper CA, Gruber MB, Munoz KD, MacConnie S. School-based cardiovascular exercise and nutrition programs with parent participation. J Health Educ. 1996; 27: S32–S39.

Kitzman-Ulrich H, Hampson R, Wilson DK, Presnell K, Brown A, O'Boyle M. An adolescent weight-loss program integrating family variables reduces energy intake. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Mar; 109(3): 491-496. PMID: 19248868.

Long JD, Stevens KR. Using technology to promote self-efficacy for healthy eating in adolescents. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2004; 36(2): 134-139. PMID: 15227760.

McAleese JD, Rankin LL. Garden-based nutrition education affects fruit and vegetable consumption in sixth-grade adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Apr; 107(4): 662-665. PMID: 17383272.

McKenzie J, Dixon LB, Smiciklas-Wright H, Mitchell D, Shannon B, Tershakovec A. Change in nutrient intakes, number of servings, and contributions of total fat from food groups in 4- to 10-year-old children enrolled in a nutrition education study. J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Sep; 96(9): 865-873. PMID: 8784330.

Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Hannan PJ, Rex J. New Moves: a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent girls. Prev Med. 2003 Jul; 37(1): 41-51. PMID: 12799128.

Olvera N, Bush JA, Sharma SV, Knox BB, Scherer RL, Butte NF. BOUNCE: A community-based mother-daughter healthy lifestyle intervention for low-income Latino families. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb; 18 Suppl 1: S102-S104. PMID: 20107454.

Parmer SM, Salisbury-Glennon J, Shannon D, Struempler B. School gardens: An experiential learning approach for a nutrition education program to increase fruit and vegetable knowledge, preference, and consumption among second-grade students. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2009 May-Jun; 41(3): 212-217. PMID: 19411056.

Prell HC, Berg MC, Jonsson LM, Lissner L. A school-based intervention to promote dietary change. J Adolesc Health. 2005 Jun; 36(6): 529. PMID: 15909359.

Reinaerts E, Crutzen R, Candel M, De Vries NK, De Nooijer J. Increasing fruit and vegetable intake among children: Comparing long-term effects of a free distribution and a multicomponent program. Health Educ Res. 2008 Dec; 23(6): 987-(96. Epub: 2008 Jun 10. PMID: 18550582.

Sahota P, Rudolf MC, Dixey R, Hill AJ, Barth JH, Cade J. Randomised controlled trial of primary school-based intervention to reduce risk factors for obesity. BMJ. 2001 Nov 3; 323(7, 320): 1, 029-1, 032. PMID: 11691759.


List of Excluded Articles with Reason

Click to see Excluded Articles.